1300 696 848 [email protected]
      Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS)

      Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS)

      What is TOS and how do us myo’s treat it? That’s what today’s blog is all about! If you have any hand or arm symptoms such as pain, numbness or tingling even if it only occurs at night it would be worthwhile having a read.

      What is TOS?

      Thoracic outlet syndrome is where the blood vessels and/or nerves become squashed between the first rib and the clavicle. This can result in numbness, tingling or pain in the neck, shoulder, arm or hand or a combination of symptoms in a combination of areas on down the same arm. If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms it can be diagnosed and treated. It usually takes a month or two to resolve. If your symptoms are severe we suggest going straight to a medical practitioner for scans and specialist opinion however if your symptoms are moderate or mild Myotherapy may be a quicker and cheaper alternative to alleviating your pain.

      professional massage therapist releasing tension in female patients neck
      TOS is related to the nerves that come from your neck down into your arm

      How does Myotherapy treat TOS?

      We will first do some clinical assessment including a neural assessment to check what is causing your symptoms. Sometimes even though you have the symptoms of thoracic outlet syndrome, your pain and symptoms can be coming from elsewhere such as carpal tunnel, from the neck of referred pain and tingling from trigger points around the shoulder, neck, arm or forearm. Once we determine the true cause for your symptoms we can usually do some treatment straight away.

      The treatment for TOS specifically involves treating the muscles and mobilising the joints involved in drawing the first rib and the clavicle closer together. These might include the scalenes or the pectoralis minor for example. Next we will work with you to develop a plan so it doesn’t become a recurring theme. This may involve simply identifying the cause and changing some habits however it may also include some home based exercises, self treatment with a self release tool or some specific exercises you will need to do under supervision. We take into account your busy lifestyle so don’t worry that you’re going to go home with a long list of exercises.

      What is the best home treatment for TOS?

      Want to try something at home to help? Find us on instagram or facebook @myothrive for tips such as spiky ball release for the pectoralis minor muscle. Because the pec minor attaches from the coracoid process which sits just under the collar bone, and then down onto the first couple of ribs, when it gets tight and short, it can lift the rib cage up causing a narrow space for the nerve, artery and vein to pass through. By gently releasing the muscle we can allow the rib cage to drop back to it’s usual resting place and give more space to the blood vessels and nerves. Overdoing this one will leave you feeling bruised so take it slow for best results.

      If you want to organise a chat with one of the Myotherapists here at Myothrive, simply email us at [email protected] and we can organise a time. Want to book now? Here’s the link!

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      3 Simple Hip Alignment Exercises – Video

      3 Simple Hip Alignment Exercises – Video

      Do you ever experience groin or hip pain during or after running, deadlifts or squats? Do you feel like you never get a good hip flexor stretch even though to you they feel tight? It might be a hip alignment issue. A hip alignment issue can lead to Femoral Acetabular Impingement (FAI) which means an impingement of the hip.

      FAI can become a problem for active and sedentary people alike. It may be aggravated by activity, sitting for long periods of time, operating the pedals in a car and crossing your legs.

      On the other hand, even if you don’t have any symptoms these exercises may improve the quality of your chosen exercise. Check out the video below where I demonstrate 3 simple exercises that are quick and easy to help get your hip alignment improving. Let us know your favourite by leaving a comment!

      Think you might have FAI?

      There are 3 main types of FAI but often aligning the joint can make a huge difference to pain and function. Often people we treat in the clinic avoid surgery and cortisone injections all together.

      Cam – This type of FAI occurs from a bit of extra bone on the head of the femur which then jams on the hip socket (acetabulum) during activity. This type typically occurs in young athletic men.

      Pincer – This occurs more often in middle aged women and is the least common type of the 3. This type is caused by extra bone around the lip of the hip socket at the front then as the femoral head rotates it catches or jams against the extra bone.

      Mixed – This is a combination of the two previous types; cam and pincer. As described above it causes a catching or jamming in the front of the joint capsule.

      These 3 types all describe bone issues however often the pain is from other tissues around the area including ligament, tendon and muscle. Better hip alignment helps reduce the bodies protective mechanism. If movement begins to feel easier and pain begins to reduce, we know we are on the right track!

      If these exercises didn’t help your hip alignment or hip and groin pain we have a lot more tricks in our Myotherapy bag. Reach out and we can have a conversation or click here to book. We offer both online and face-to-face consultations.

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      Pain in Children & Adolescents. Can Myotherapy help?

      Pain in Children & Adolescents. Can Myotherapy help?

      myotherapy for kids

      Just like adults, children and adolescents can also experience musculoskeletal imbalances, conditions and pain. So how do you tell what your child is going through and what health professional to take them to?

      If you child has been complaining of severe pain following a fall or injury it may be worth a visit to the doctor to rule out a fracture. If you’re not sure, come to us first to avoid exposing your child unnecessarily to radiation associated with scans. We will be able to assess whether it’s something that needs further investigation.

      Other pain in children or adolescent that may be encountered include; growing pains, sprains and strains, muscle cramps, tight muscles from sport, joint alignment issues, scoliosis and other conditions such as childhood forms of arthritis. Some of these conditions we will be able to treat and some we will need to refer to your doctor or a specialist.

      So how exactly can a Myotherapist help?

      Step 1. Assessment

      The first step in treating pain in children is to talking to your child about their pain complaint. Sometimes they need a bit of help from you (parent or guardian) but we try to develop a good relationship with your child by encouraging good communication with us directly. We might ask questions about your child’s pain; how long as the complaint been occurring? How long does the pain typically last when it comes on? Have you had this in the past? What type of pain (or can you think of another time you have had this kind of pain)? When do you notice it the most? Is there anything that relieves the pain?

      Once we have an understanding of what has been going on, it gives us ideas of what things to check. This helps us rule out more serious conditions or confirm something that we can treat on the day. The assessment might be getting them to do a specific movement, it might include testing joint, nerve or muscle or getting them to do an exercise to see if it helps.

      If we find something we are unsure of we will refer you to the appropriate health care professional such as a GP. If we find something we can help with we will move on to the treatment phase of the consultation.

      Step 2. Treatment

      With pain in children and adolescents, it’s really important to try to empower them to learn about their bodies and treat themselves. That’s why we try to stay as hands-off as possible. Treatment will usually start with specialised movement therapy or instructing them where to place a spiky ball to help. Upon reassessment if progression is slow then we will become more hands on. This hands on treatment may include joint mobilisation (not cracking), dry needling (if when discussed child and parent is not apprehensive), trigger point therapy and massage/myofascial release techniques.

      Sometimes treatment will include a few different approaches but rest assured we will always explain what we’ve found and discuss the treatment plan with you as we go. We then like to retest and make adjustments throughout the treatment to make sure the pain is reducing and the range of movement is increasing. Again always discussing with your child and yourself as we go.

      Step 3. Management

      Next we will talk about things that are going to be helpful at home for your child’s pain complaint, we like to call this a “Remedy Routine”. This may include applying heat or ice to an affected area. It may include and exercise to stretch or strengthen, mobilise or align. It may include self treatment with a spiky ball or foam roller, it may include a care plan where we check in on their musculoskeletal complaint more regularly (this is ideal for more persistent problems). We will also answer any questions you have and make sure we have set an achievable plan that will fit into their schedule and into your life as a parent/guardian too.

      kid sporting injury

      Our Experience

      We have built great professional relationships with some local sporting clubs including a gymnastics and acro club, a cricket club and some dance studios.

      The clubs find their members are away less from injury when working with us and the parents find they are more confident in the clubs because they know we can offer advice and help out where needed.

      We have been treating pain in children and adolescents since starting the Mount Waverley clinic in 2012. Over the years we’ve found the most common issues are posture at school and when doing study at home; not understanding how to control their bodies properly for particular sports or activities; and overuse from having breaks over school holidays, for example, then amping up training regimes when returning from the break. If this sounds like your child then get in contact and find out more about how we can help 🙂

      We believe keeping your children active and happy is important to their overall health & development.

      Myothrive

      Just remember, persistent pain in children is not normal and should always be checked out. Email [email protected] if you have a specific question or click here to make a face to face or virtual booking. Virtual consultations are great for kids because we get to see their environment where they study or play and give them exercises that they can comfortably do at home. Best of all you don’t have to drive them to another appointment!

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      Ankle Stability

      Ankle Stability

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      Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

      Why is my ankle stability important?

      Whether you enjoy running, gymnastics, lifting weights or walking the dogs, ankle stability is important. Even moving from standing to sitting and vice versa requires some ankle mobility and stability. We want your ankles to be strong and flexible. Keep reading to learn how to test your ankles and also watch the video to learn the first steps of getting for stability.

      How do I test my ankle stability?

      Stand close to a wall or something you can grab onto if you loose your balance. Stand on one leg for 30 seconds. Now try the other side. If that was easy now try with your eyes closed. Be mindful you may loose your balance so make sure you are in a safe environment or we can go through it with you in the clinic. Again aim for 30 seconds each side. If you found you were wobbly on either of these exercises then it’s time to focus on building some ankle stability for yourself. You wouldn’t build a house without a good foundation and we shouldn’t expect our bodies to perform well if we aren’t taking care of our standing foundation, our ankles and feet. Watch the video below to take the next step!

      What if I have an injury?

      If you are suffering with any sort of pain related to or that may be coming from your feet / ankles. I suggest making a session with us to fully assess how to best remedy your individual situation. We can offer consultations both in the clinic and online for your convenience. Look forward to helping you become pain free and thrive!

      P.S – here’s the booking link incase you need it 🙂


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      Top 3 spots to self massage – lower body edition

      Top 3 spots to self massage – lower body edition

      Whether its a spiky ball, a lacrosse ball or a borrowed tennis ball from your dog (maybe wash it first?!), they are great for relieving tight muscles all over the body. Due to covid-19 isoloation happening all over the world, todays post will be focused on helping those who are staying at home. Remember more is not better. Max 60 seconds on each spot and max 3 minutes on each muscle. Pro Tip: do a wall supported forward bend and see how far you can go. Try again afterwards to notice how much of a difference these release techniques make to your range of movement.

      Disclaimer: These exercises may not be right for you. We recommend you check with your musculoskeletal health care provider before trying any new exercises or therapies.

      1. Glutes

      A good glute release will leave you feeling ligther in the low back. A lot of our MyoThrive customers have heavy sore backs from sitting so much while in iso at home. Have a break from the desk and try this standing glute release.

      Step 1 – Put the ball between your glute muscle and the wall.

      Step 2 – Find a sore spot, then let it sink in for 30-60 sec until it eases off.

      Step 3 – Try finding a few more spots. Also don’t forget the other side!


      2. Hamstring

      I’m sure a lot of you are feeling tight calves right now from all that sitting, running and squatting! Tight hamstrings can lead to sore knees, hips and low back. Maybe you’ll be able to touch your toes again after this one!

      Step 1 – Sit on the floor and position the ball between your hamstring and a block or book.

      Step 2 – Once you’ve found a spot, bend and straighten your knee until you feel it ease (approx 30-60 sec).

      Step 3 – Find a few more spots and repeat. Stay in the top 2/3rds of the muscle and search to the sides where most of the trigger points lie.


      3. Calves

      Tight calves can cause problems not only locally around the calf, ankle and foot but can also refer tightness into the lower back. Sitting to much can create stagnation in the calf muscles plus if the only exercise you’re able to do right now is walking and running, they are going to need some self massage TLC!

      Step 1 – Sit on the floor and position the ball between your calf and a block or book.

      Step 2 – Once you’ve found a spot, point and flex you foot until you feel it ease (approx 30-60 sec).

      Step 3 – Find a few more spots and repeat. Stay in the top 2/3rds of the calf and search to the sides where most of the trigger points lie.


      Don’t forget to check out our “upper body edition” for neck, shoulders and forearms.

      Subscribe to get the latest or join us on social. We post regularly on instagram and facebook. Look for @myothrive or search for your favourite practitioner.

      Need Supplies or a bit of extra help?

      We can drop ship anything you need straight from our suppliers to your door! Simply email [email protected] with what you need. Some products can be ordered straight from the website. Click on “shop” in the links bar. In addition we are offering online and in clinic consultations for people who need a bit more help. Click here to find a time that suits you best.

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      Top 3 spots to self massage when working from home – upper body edition

      Top 3 spots to self massage when working from home – upper body edition

      If you already have a self massage ball, you probably know how amazing they are. Whether its a spiky ball, a lacrosse ball or a borrowed cricket ball from your kids, they are great for relieving tight muscles all over the body. Due to covid-19 isoloation happening all over the world, todays post will be focused on helping those who are working from home.

      Disclaimer: These exercises may not be right for you. We recommend you check with your musculoskeletal health care provider before trying any new exercises or therapies.

      1. Forearms

      A lot of our customers have been commenting how sore their arms are getting from going from a ergonomic desk set up to a throw together home office set up. Some of them don’t have the same amount or length of breaks because everything is so handy in a home set up environment. If this is sounding familiar and your arms are starting to feel like dead weights, give this self release technique a go.

      Step 1 – Put the ball on the bench and put your forearm on the ball.

      Step 2 – Hold on the sore spot and then move your wrist back and forth, you can even add a stretch with the other hand which aids the myofascial release. 30-60 seconds on each spot should be plenty.

      Step 3 – Try finding a few more spots. Also try the other side of the forearm.


      2. Between the shoulder blades

      This self massage technique can be done with one ball, but it feels amazing if you have 2. You can also use what’s called a bak ball or a peanut where it’s like they stuck 2 balls together. If you don’t have that you can simply put 2 balls inside a sock to hold them together. The 2 balls in a sock idea actually works better because you can move them further apart for different areas of the spine by tying knots between the balls. Try this technique on the between the shoulder blades first but it may feel nice to try on your neck or other areas of your back. Just remember you are aiming to release muscle, don’t put the balls directly on the spine.

      Step 1 – Lie on your back with the balls underneath you between your shoulder blades. Make sure the balls are going across ways so they don’t press on your spine.

      Step 2 – Hug your elbows and gently circle your arms 5 times in 1 direction and then 5 times in the other direction. It should feel like a nice massage.

      Step 3 – Repeat this process on 2-3 other sore spots you find between the shoulder blades.


      3. Neck

      No doubt that your neck is probably coping most of the home office stress right now. We go from working at the computer in our work time to checking our phone (words with friends is soooo addictive), watching television or reading a book in our down time. All this head forward posture puts a lot of repetitive load on our neck. Try this self massage technique if your neck is feeling stiff or starting to give you headaches!

      Step 1 – Lie on your back and place the ball under the base of your skull.

      Step 2 – roll your head from side to side or do small nodding actions to find a good spot.

      Step 3 – Let it sink in on each sore spot for about 30-60 seconds. Choose 2 or 3 spots, there’s no benefit to over doing it!


      Lower Body Edition Coming soon

      Subscribe to get the latest or join us on social. We post regularly on instagram and facebook. Look for @myothrive or search for your favourite practitioner.

      Need Supplies?

      We stock spiky balls, lacrosse balls and peanuts for all your self massage needs! Simply email [email protected] with what you’re after. If you live local to us we’ll even drop it off to your letter box in iso style! In addition we are offering online and in clinic consultations for people who need a bit more help. Click here to find a time that suits you best.

      Check out some of our other learning hub posts

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