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      Pain in Children & Adolescents. Can Myotherapy help?

      Pain in Children & Adolescents. Can Myotherapy help?

      myotherapy for kids

      Just like adults, children and adolescents can also experience musculoskeletal imbalances, conditions and pain. So how do you tell what your child is going through and what health professional to take them to?

      If you child has been complaining of severe pain following a fall or injury it may be worth a visit to the doctor to rule out a fracture. If you’re not sure, come to us first to avoid exposing your child unnecessarily to radiation associated with scans. We will be able to assess whether it’s something that needs further investigation.

      Other pain in children or adolescent that may be encountered include; growing pains, sprains and strains, muscle cramps, tight muscles from sport, joint alignment issues, scoliosis and other conditions such as childhood forms of arthritis. Some of these conditions we will be able to treat and some we will need to refer to your doctor or a specialist.

      So how exactly can a Myotherapist help?

      Step 1. Assessment

      The first step in treating pain in children is to talking to your child about their pain complaint. Sometimes they need a bit of help from you (parent or guardian) but we try to develop a good relationship with your child by encouraging good communication with us directly. We might ask questions about your child’s pain; how long as the complaint been occurring? How long does the pain typically last when it comes on? Have you had this in the past? What type of pain (or can you think of another time you have had this kind of pain)? When do you notice it the most? Is there anything that relieves the pain?

      Once we have an understanding of what has been going on, it gives us ideas of what things to check. This helps us rule out more serious conditions or confirm something that we can treat on the day. The assessment might be getting them to do a specific movement, it might include testing joint, nerve or muscle or getting them to do an exercise to see if it helps.

      If we find something we are unsure of we will refer you to the appropriate health care professional such as a GP. If we find something we can help with we will move on to the treatment phase of the consultation.

      Step 2. Treatment

      With pain in children and adolescents, it’s really important to try to empower them to learn about their bodies and treat themselves. That’s why we try to stay as hands-off as possible. Treatment will usually start with specialised movement therapy or instructing them where to place a spiky ball to help. Upon reassessment if progression is slow then we will become more hands on. This hands on treatment may include joint mobilisation (not cracking), dry needling (if when discussed child and parent is not apprehensive), trigger point therapy and massage/myofascial release techniques.

      Sometimes treatment will include a few different approaches but rest assured we will always explain what we’ve found and discuss the treatment plan with you as we go. We then like to retest and make adjustments throughout the treatment to make sure the pain is reducing and the range of movement is increasing. Again always discussing with your child and yourself as we go.

      Step 3. Management

      Next we will talk about things that are going to be helpful at home for your child’s pain complaint, we like to call this a “Remedy Routine”. This may include applying heat or ice to an affected area. It may include and exercise to stretch or strengthen, mobilise or align. It may include self treatment with a spiky ball or foam roller, it may include a care plan where we check in on their musculoskeletal complaint more regularly (this is ideal for more persistent problems). We will also answer any questions you have and make sure we have set an achievable plan that will fit into their schedule and into your life as a parent/guardian too.

      kid sporting injury

      Our Experience

      We have built great professional relationships with some local sporting clubs including a gymnastics and acro club, a cricket club and some dance studios.

      The clubs find their members are away less from injury when working with us and the parents find they are more confident in the clubs because they know we can offer advice and help out where needed.

      We have been treating pain in children and adolescents since starting the Mount Waverley clinic in 2012. Over the years we’ve found the most common issues are posture at school and when doing study at home; not understanding how to control their bodies properly for particular sports or activities; and overuse from having breaks over school holidays, for example, then amping up training regimes when returning from the break. If this sounds like your child then get in contact and find out more about how we can help 🙂

      We believe keeping your children active and happy is important to their overall health & development.

      Myothrive

      Just remember, persistent pain in children is not normal and should always be checked out. Email [email protected] if you have a specific question or click here to make a face to face or virtual booking. Virtual consultations are great for kids because we get to see their environment where they study or play and give them exercises that they can comfortably do at home. Best of all you don’t have to drive them to another appointment!

      Some other blog posts you might find interesting

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      4 reasons to keep your foam roller.

      4 reasons to keep your foam roller.

      iStock_000054793842_Medium

      Foam rollers have been on the scene for a while now. There are new kids on the block such as the rumble roller and the power stick to name a few. However; there are some ways of using the foam roller that just doesn’t work so well with the other kinds of myofascial release tools so if you want to minimise the amount of myofascial release tools you have lying around your house, a full length foam roller is a good buy. Here are our top 4 ways to use your foam roller.

      1. More than just massage

      The foam roller can be used for self massage in a lot of areas of the body including the legs and back to name a few.

      It can also be used for stretching the chest, stretching the hip flexors, perform balancing exercises and strengthen the lower abdominals! It is very versatile which when considering what product to buy is a huge plus. If you were only going to buy one tool, compared to a spikey ball or a rumble roller, the foam roller is definitely a winner!

      2. Save you money

      Foam rolling regularly on you predetermined tight areas, combined with the right stretches and some prescribed strengthening exercises, can definitely reduce the amount of trips you might need to your musculoskeletal care person. In the long run it might save you a few bucks! Talk to us about putting a program together that’s right for you. Book online here.

      3. Perform better at work, hobbies and sports

      When foam roller exercises are part of a program to enhance correct postural alignment or to assist the correct muscle development set for a specific sport it can really make a difference to how you perform.

      For example, a runner with tight hip flexors…The push off phase of running is the part where the back of the leg needs to do the work and the front of the leg needs to start to lengthen. If you have tight hip flexors it doesn’t allow your leg to come into the correct alignment meaning you end up using all the wrong muscles and over working those that are switching on. By foam rolling and actively stretching the hip flexors before a run you’re making sure the muscles, joints and nerves are ready to perform at their peak.

      At work if your posture is better you will be able to perform your duties for longer without fatiguing or pain, whether it’s a standing or a sitting job. And hobbies much the same, you will be able to do longer sessions of the things you love without having to worry about pain the next day, a good example of this is gardening. Have you ever woken the next day with a tight low back after gardening? You should be able to enjoy what you love without struggle and without pain, this is what the foam roller combined with the right advice can do for you.

      4. Relieve stress

      I think most of us are aware of how good it feels to release endorphins and other “feel good” hormones. You can release endorphins and other calming neurotransmitters when you foam roll. It can also be quite meditative depending on your environment. Some of my customers do their routine at night before bed. They find a quite spot where they have a block of time to themselves. They might play some music and turn down the lights to promote higher levels of melatonin to kick in. It’s about finding what works for you but some of them are counting out of how many reps they are doing, some focus on their breathing, some focus on the sensation of their muscles beginning to soften beneath the roller.

      Want some ideas of what to do on the foam roller? Check out our youtube channel or this video specifically which has a foam roller routine you can follow along to.


      Did you know a Myotherapist can help with pain, restriction and conditions of muscles, joints and nerves. We can assess, treat and prescribe movement therapy to help you feel better and learn how to treat yourself! Click here to find a time that suits you best.

      Video: shoulder stability to improve push-ups

      Video: shoulder stability to improve push-ups

      With the current push-up challenge being a highlight of people’s time in isolation and having served as a great way to raise some money for charity, I have to admit, we were kind of cringing here at Myothrive. We rarely see a push-up performed well and furthermore we would always pair a push activity with a pull activity to balance out the strength gains. With that in mind we thought this week would be a great time to share this video on shoulder stability. Check it out and follow along to improve your shoulder posture, correctly activate the deep stabilising muscles and get stronger!

      Hopefully you found that helpful. Remember a tailored program with someone correcting for your specific shoulder stability needs may work better for you if you are recovering from pain or a previous injury. We are available online and in the clinic for consultations. Click here to check out our schedule and find a time that suits you best.

      In addition we thought you might also like to check out these other shoulder stability related posts. Get some simple tips on how to improve your posture, how to stretch a tight pec muscle or how to strengthen your lower traps.

      With the stretch based blog below keep in mind that we recommend more dynamic stretches for before a workout and a static stretch once warmed up or after your workout. This is because research has found that holding a stretch before a workout sends the wrong messages for the work that is about to come and can lead to a great risk of injury.

      clinical_exercises

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      Top 3 spots to self massage – lower body edition

      Top 3 spots to self massage – lower body edition

      Whether its a spiky ball, a lacrosse ball or a borrowed tennis ball from your dog (maybe wash it first?!), they are great for relieving tight muscles all over the body. Due to covid-19 isoloation happening all over the world, todays post will be focused on helping those who are staying at home. Remember more is not better. Max 60 seconds on each spot and max 3 minutes on each muscle. Pro Tip: do a wall supported forward bend and see how far you can go. Try again afterwards to notice how much of a difference these release techniques make to your range of movement.

      Disclaimer: These exercises may not be right for you. We recommend you check with your musculoskeletal health care provider before trying any new exercises or therapies.

      1. Glutes

      A good glute release will leave you feeling ligther in the low back. A lot of our MyoThrive customers have heavy sore backs from sitting so much while in iso at home. Have a break from the desk and try this standing glute release.

      Step 1 – Put the ball between your glute muscle and the wall.

      Step 2 – Find a sore spot, then let it sink in for 30-60 sec until it eases off.

      Step 3 – Try finding a few more spots. Also don’t forget the other side!


      2. Hamstring

      I’m sure a lot of you are feeling tight calves right now from all that sitting, running and squatting! Tight hamstrings can lead to sore knees, hips and low back. Maybe you’ll be able to touch your toes again after this one!

      Step 1 – Sit on the floor and position the ball between your hamstring and a block or book.

      Step 2 – Once you’ve found a spot, bend and straighten your knee until you feel it ease (approx 30-60 sec).

      Step 3 – Find a few more spots and repeat. Stay in the top 2/3rds of the muscle and search to the sides where most of the trigger points lie.


      3. Calves

      Tight calves can cause problems not only locally around the calf, ankle and foot but can also refer tightness into the lower back. Sitting to much can create stagnation in the calf muscles plus if the only exercise you’re able to do right now is walking and running, they are going to need some self massage TLC!

      Step 1 – Sit on the floor and position the ball between your calf and a block or book.

      Step 2 – Once you’ve found a spot, point and flex you foot until you feel it ease (approx 30-60 sec).

      Step 3 – Find a few more spots and repeat. Stay in the top 2/3rds of the calf and search to the sides where most of the trigger points lie.


      Don’t forget to check out our “upper body edition” for neck, shoulders and forearms.

      Subscribe to get the latest or join us on social. We post regularly on instagram and facebook. Look for @myothrive or search for your favourite practitioner.

      Need Supplies or a bit of extra help?

      We can drop ship anything you need straight from our suppliers to your door! Simply email [email protected] with what you need. Some products can be ordered straight from the website. Click on “shop” in the links bar. In addition we are offering online and in clinic consultations for people who need a bit more help. Click here to find a time that suits you best.

      Check out some of our other learning hub posts

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      Strengthen Your Glutes!

      Strengthen Your Glutes!

      “We must embrace pain and burn it as fuel for our journey”

      ― Kenji Miyazawa

      Where are your glutes?

      You glute muscles make up your bottom. There is the biggest and one closest to the surface called the gluteus maximus, the next deepest one called the gluteus medius and finally the even deeper and smallest one called gluteus minimus. There is also one we focus on a lot when we talk glutes called the piriformis. It’s quite a deep muscle and when it gets tight it can cause hip issues and sciatica type symptoms. Getting stronger glutes can help to offload the piriformis.

      Strengthen your glutes, reduce back pain. Stronger glutes can help offload back, hip and knee joints

      Why should I strengthen my glutes?

      1. Fill your jeans! Who doesn’t want a more shapely bottom!
      2. Stops other muscles such as back, hip flexors and hamstrings from becoming over used and over worked.
      3. By building and maintaining stronger glutes, it takes the pressure of your back, hip and knee joints for day to day tasks such as walking, sitting and bending.
      4. Reduces wearing of your back joints. If your glutes and low abs are weak combined with short tight muscles in your back and inner thighs, it can cause an increased curve in your back. This increased curve also called lordosis, can lead to early onset of degeneration and other back issues.
      5. Release tight glutes. It sounds like it should be the opposite, but where there is weakness, we often find tightness. This is due to the nervous system overreacting to feeling unstable. It will tell the muscles to spasm up to protect.

      Follow along with MyoThrive Practitioner Sarah and start to strengthen your glutes! For beginners and advanced alike. Learn how to self massage the knots away, activate the glutes to fire them up and then embrace the burn!

      Sarah is a Clinical Myotherapist and Clinical Pilates Instructor. She is also trained in the McKenzie method (aka Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy). She draws on her training and experience to ensure your nerves and muscles are ready to go before you start the work. “In my experience, this method results in better activation in the right muscles and also reduces the chance of injury.”

      Now available online! If you’d like some extra help from Sarah and the MyoThrive team, get in contact via email [email protected] or find a time that suits you best in our online booking system.

      Top 3 spots to self massage when working from home – upper body edition

      Top 3 spots to self massage when working from home – upper body edition

      If you already have a self massage ball, you probably know how amazing they are. Whether its a spiky ball, a lacrosse ball or a borrowed cricket ball from your kids, they are great for relieving tight muscles all over the body. Due to covid-19 isoloation happening all over the world, todays post will be focused on helping those who are working from home.

      Disclaimer: These exercises may not be right for you. We recommend you check with your musculoskeletal health care provider before trying any new exercises or therapies.

      1. Forearms

      A lot of our customers have been commenting how sore their arms are getting from going from a ergonomic desk set up to a throw together home office set up. Some of them don’t have the same amount or length of breaks because everything is so handy in a home set up environment. If this is sounding familiar and your arms are starting to feel like dead weights, give this self release technique a go.

      Step 1 – Put the ball on the bench and put your forearm on the ball.

      Step 2 – Hold on the sore spot and then move your wrist back and forth, you can even add a stretch with the other hand which aids the myofascial release. 30-60 seconds on each spot should be plenty.

      Step 3 – Try finding a few more spots. Also try the other side of the forearm.


      2. Between the shoulder blades

      This self massage technique can be done with one ball, but it feels amazing if you have 2. You can also use what’s called a bak ball or a peanut where it’s like they stuck 2 balls together. If you don’t have that you can simply put 2 balls inside a sock to hold them together. The 2 balls in a sock idea actually works better because you can move them further apart for different areas of the spine by tying knots between the balls. Try this technique on the between the shoulder blades first but it may feel nice to try on your neck or other areas of your back. Just remember you are aiming to release muscle, don’t put the balls directly on the spine.

      Step 1 – Lie on your back with the balls underneath you between your shoulder blades. Make sure the balls are going across ways so they don’t press on your spine.

      Step 2 – Hug your elbows and gently circle your arms 5 times in 1 direction and then 5 times in the other direction. It should feel like a nice massage.

      Step 3 – Repeat this process on 2-3 other sore spots you find between the shoulder blades.


      3. Neck

      No doubt that your neck is probably coping most of the home office stress right now. We go from working at the computer in our work time to checking our phone (words with friends is soooo addictive), watching television or reading a book in our down time. All this head forward posture puts a lot of repetitive load on our neck. Try this self massage technique if your neck is feeling stiff or starting to give you headaches!

      Step 1 – Lie on your back and place the ball under the base of your skull.

      Step 2 – roll your head from side to side or do small nodding actions to find a good spot.

      Step 3 – Let it sink in on each sore spot for about 30-60 seconds. Choose 2 or 3 spots, there’s no benefit to over doing it!


      Lower Body Edition Coming soon

      Subscribe to get the latest or join us on social. We post regularly on instagram and facebook. Look for @myothrive or search for your favourite practitioner.

      Need Supplies?

      We stock spiky balls, lacrosse balls and peanuts for all your self massage needs! Simply email [email protected] with what you’re after. If you live local to us we’ll even drop it off to your letter box in iso style! In addition we are offering online and in clinic consultations for people who need a bit more help. Click here to find a time that suits you best.

      Check out some of our other learning hub posts

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